Accommodations for Visitors and Program Participants

The University of Wisconsin-Madison provides processes for visitors and program participants who are not employees or students to request reasonable accommodations.  Our goal is to provide a prompt response for reasonable accommodation requests and to provide access to the programs and facilities of the university.

Most accommodations for visitors and program participants are provided directly through the hosting unit.  However, the Visitor and Program Participant Access Consultant at the McBurney Center is available to answer questions, consult with departments, and assist in identifying who to contact to make a request.

Departments and Hosting Units


Are you a faculty, staff, or student organization who has questions about visitor or program participant accommodations or needs training?  Please complete the following form or call the McBurney Center at voice/Relay711 at (608) 263-2741 or text us at (608) 225-7956. Business hours are 8:00am-4:30pm, Monday through Friday.

Visitor/Guest/Program Participant Reasonable Accommodation Consultation Form

Visitor and Program Participants


If you are a visitor or program participant, you can request accommodations by contacting the hosting unit.  If you have general questions regarding the accommodation request process or are unable to locate contact info for the hosting unit, please let us know.

More Information for Visitors and Program Participants

Requesting Sign Language Interpreting or Professional Live Captioning (CART)


Visitors and program participants who need sign language interpreting or professional live captioning (CART) can either contact the hosting unit or complete the following form.

Request Sign Language Interpreting or Captioning (No UW NetID)

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) for Sign Language Interpreting or Live Professional Captioning (CART) Coordinated through the McBurney Disability Resource Center

Information About Sign Language Interpreting and Live Professional Captioning (CART) Requests

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I do not have all the details about our event yet, when should I submit the request for interpreting or live professional captioning?

Make your request as soon as you have the date and time of the request available. The earlier we have the request, the more time we have to find an Interpreter or CART provider. These service providers can be booked up weeks in advance. Please create your request and indicate either the approximate location (e.g. building without a room number) or that the location will be determined.

The lead time to fill a request depends on the nature of the request, timing of the request, availability of service providers and related support. Therefore, best practice is to submit the request as early as possible so that we can start looking for service providers.

As an example, a one-hour request in the middle of the day during the semester is more difficult to fill than a one-hour request in the evening. A one-hour request is typically easier to fill than a 2-day conference.

Coordinating sign language interpreting and live professional captioning (CART) is subject to service provider availability

Note: Requests are reviewed Monday-Friday, 8:00 am-4:30 pm. Requests submitted outside of this time will be reviewed the next business day.

I received a request for an accommodation for an event that is happening very soon. Can I still make an accommodation request with less than two days’ notice?

Yes, please make your request as soon as you receive it. The Communication Access team will try to fill last minute requests and will let you know if we cannot fill the request.

Note: Requests are reviewed Monday-Friday, 8:00 am-4:30 pm. Requests submitted outside of this time will be reviewed the next business day.

If I have a sign language interpreter or live professional captioner for an event, will they also interpret or provide live captioning for any media that the presenters use?

No, interpreting or live captioning will not be provided for the videos in real time or live.

You need to create closed captions all pre-recorded videos/media prior to your event or use videos/media that are already captioned. Adding captions takes time, so please include time to acquire videos and produce the captions in your event planning.

If you are requesting sign language interpreting or live professional captioning for your event AND you will be showing media during the event, the Communication Access team can, with 48 business hours’ notice, produce the closed captioning for this media.

I have a NetID. What information will I need when I log into CommunicationAccess@UW to make a request?

The first time you use CommunicationAccess@UW you will need to enter the sponsoring department’s funding string information. Here is the information that will be requested.

  • UDDS number
  • Fund (3-digit number)
  • Project Name/Number (if applicable, should be 7 characters, maybe letters, numbers or a combination of both)
  • Program Number (0-9)
  • You will also need to provide the name and email address of a financial contact person for the request.

Note: If the request is for an accommodation, funding information is still required but will only be used for tracking and reporting purposes.

I would like to have either a virtual or hybrid event, is there a list of rooms that can be used for virtual or hybrid events?

There are many rooms on campus that are ideal for hosting a virtual or hybrid meeting.

Funding Questions

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I do not have a specific accommodation request currently. Can I change my request from a Public Access to an Accommodation Request later if an accommodation request is made?

Yes, you can update your request by emailing the Communication Access team.   Let the team know that you have received an accommodation request and provide the name of the person who has made the request.

I have a specific disability related accommodation request, why do you need my UDDS information?

The UDDS number will be used for tracking purposes only. We are tracking which departments are utilizing the central funding for interpreting/captioning. We will only use the funding information for billing if the request is for public access.

Can I cancel my request if I do not receive an accommodation request, so I do not have to pay for it?

If you made a public access request, you do not receive an accommodation request, and you did not advertise that interpreting/captioning would be available, you may cancel the request at least 72 business hours prior to your event and you will not be billed.

I have an accommodation request for live professional captioning (CART) captioning and would like to display the captions for everyone. Will the rental cost of the monitor or projection equipment be funded centrally?

No, these additional costs will not be covered centrally by campus. The sponsoring department is responsible for any additional costs, other than the sign language interpreting, live professional captioning and the related post-production captioning.

I am making a request, but one of the speakers will be showing a video clip. Will the cost to have the video closed captioned by covered centrally?

Yes, if you are requesting interpreting or live professional captioning for your event AND you will be showing media during the event, the McBurney Center can, with a minimum of 48 business hours’ notice, produce the closed captioning for the video clip and the cost will centrally funded.

The host or presenter wants to request sign language interpreting or captioning for their event to make it more accessible. Is this considered an Accommodation Request?

No, this is considered a Public Access request unless there is a specific, individual disability-related accommodation request for sign language interpreting or captioning.

If I do not receive an accommodation request, will I be charged for the public access request?

Yes, if you do not have a specific disability accommodation request, you will be charged for the services provided.   The request is considered a proactive request for public access.

If you decide you want to cancel the request, please email the Communication Access Team and include the name, date, and time of the event.

If the request is cancelled less than two business days before the event, your department will remain responsible for the service charges.  For example, if the event is at 10:00 a.m. Monday morning, you would need to notify the Communication Access Team of the cancellation before 10:00 a.m. on the preceding Thursday.

My department is going to incur interpreter or captioner costs for accommodations outside of the McBurney Center process. Can we be reimbursed if the request is for an accommodation?

Please email the McBurney Center CommunicationAccess team, in advance of the event or hiring agencies/staff, to discuss options and whether hiring interpreters or CART providers directly would qualify to be funded centrally.

How are payments processed?

If you have a public access request, the Communication Access Team will send an invoice after the request is complete. The funds will then be transferred for the service using the funding information you provided.

Can the host or presenter request a sign language interpreter or live captioning for themselves?

Yes, the host or presenter may make a request if they have a disability that necessitates sign language interpreting or captioning as an accommodation.

When you are making your request, please make a note in the request that the accommodation request is for the presenter. The placement of the interpreter or the live captions may need to be discussed with the Communication Access team.

Now that the costs of sign language interpreting and live professional captioning (CART) accommodations are centrally funded by campus, should we still budget for accessibility and accommodations costs?

Yes, you should still budget for accessibility and accommodations costs beyond what is covered centrally. For example, you may have costs associated with improving the accessibility of your website, proactively providing live professional captioning for events, or other unrelated accommodations.

I am coordinating an event for a student organization, and I do not have a UDDS number, how can I make a request?

You can make your request in CommunicationAcccess@UW . When you log in, you will get a pop-up box asking for funding information.    You can select “I am making this request for a student organization.”   This will allow you to enter the software and create your request.

General Accessibility Questions

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I do not have a specific disability accommodation request, but I would like to proactively make my event accessible. Should I request both a sign language interpreter and a live professional captioner for the event?

If your goal is to make your event more accessible to the public, it is recommended to provide live professional captioning. Live captioning can be displayed for all participants and many people can benefit from having captions.

If there is not an accommodation request for a sign language interpreter, providing an interpreter at your event will not increase general access to participants. The population of people who would request and use sign language interpreters is very small. In addition, the pool of sign language interpreters in our area is also very small, so is a limited resource. If there are interpreters at your event, then there may not be interpreters available to fulfill an accommodation request for an event where there is a deaf person.

What is an example accessibility tagline that I can use on our registration form to request an accommodation to attend our event?

If you are adding the accessibility tagline onto the registration form for your event, it is recommended that you add the following.

Do you need an accommodation to attend this event?

Yes or No

If yes, then please select the accommodation you will need:

  • Sign Language Interpreter (ASL Interpreter)
  • Professional live professional captioning (CART)
  • Closed captioning on any media that will be used by the presenters
  • Automatic or machine captioning in virtual platform
  • Other: __________________

Note:   The McBurney Center only coordinates sign language interpreting and live professional captioning requests.    If you receive a request for another type of accommodation, the accommodation request will have to be provided by the host of the event.

It is best practice to include an accessibility tagline on all public information advertising your event.  These statements give participants with disabilities relevant information on who to contact to request timely accommodations.  Here is an example:

If you need an accommodation to attend this event, please contact <name, event host/coordinator> at <phone number & email>. All accommodation requests should be made no less than <two weeks: see note> before the event. We will attempt to fulfill requests made after this date but cannot guarantee they will be met.

[Note: If your event is being advertised with less than three weeks’ notice, then you will need to adjust the timeline indicated for accommodations requests.]

If I do not receive an accommodation request, do I have to provide sign language interpreting or live professional captioning (CART)?

If you have included an accessibility tagline and do not receive a request for an accommodation, you are not currently required to provide interpreters or live professional captioning (CART).  However, live professional captioning (CART) is encouraged for signature and larger events.

If your event is virtual (e.g., Zoom) and you do not have a specific accommodation request, it is recommended that you enable the auto captions as an option for participants.

Please also refer to How to follow UW-Madison’s Digital Accessibility Policy

How do I inform participants about the available accessibility features for an event?

Along with an accessibility tagline, it is also best practice to share with participants accessibility features that you are providing proactively. Examples include:

  • Professional live professional captioning (CART) – Include info on how to access the live captions (Example, captions will be projected, or you will need to bring a personal device to view the captions)
  • Sign language interpreting (ASL) – Include info on how to access the interpreter(s) (Example, the interpreter will only be onsite, or the interpreter will be working remote and will be projected to the audience onsite)
  • Audio description – Include info on how to access the audio descriptions or audio described version
  • Assistive listening devices (ALDs) – Include info on where and how to check out an ALD (this information will be specific to your venue)
  • Auto or machine captions – Include info on how to turn on the auto captions. Note that while auto captions may provide access for some individuals, they may be insufficient for others. Individuals can still request live professional captioning (CART) captioning as an accommodation as appropriate.

Contact the Communication Access Team if you have questions about how to write about the accessibility you will be providing proactively.

General Information About Live Professional Captioning (CART)

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I received an email asking if there would be captioning at our event. Is this considered a disability-related accommodation request?

No, this question would require follow up. The cost of the professional captioning to be covered centrally by the university, if the request is indicating there is a disability-related accommodation.  An example response would be:

“We do not have professional, live professional captioning (CART) scheduled for this event.  If you need captioning (either auto or professional) as a disability-related accommodation, please let me know or contact <insert name and email> as soon as possible so that this accommodation can be arranged.”

Someone contacted me and asked if there would be captioning our event. Can I use the auto captioning feature?

You can provide auto (also referred to as AI captions or machine captions) if the request is not a request for a disability-related accommodation or if the person with the disability is specifically requesting access to auto captions as an accommodation.  However, typically if live captioning is requested as a disability-related accommodation, then professional CART captions are provided.

The quality of auto captioning is typically not high enough to be used for accommodation purposes, particularly for someone who is Deaf or hard of hearing.   The quality of the auto captioning can vary depending on many factors including the vocabulary, the speed and audio quality of the speaker, the number of speakers and other sounds and/or voices happening simultaneously.

Can I use the professional captioning transcript to create the closed captions for the recordings of the event?

No, the transcript is not a verbatim transcript and is not suitable for closed captioning without additional post-production work, including the insertion of time codes and text editing (e.g. correcting spelling errors, adding environmental sounds, speaker info, etc.). Live professional captioning is intended to provide live communication access to individuals who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing or for public access. DoIT provides additional information on creating accessible videos/media.

Providing and Supporting Live Professional Captioning (CART)

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How is the live professional captioning provided for my event?

Live professional captioning services are provided remotely, regardless if your event is onsite or virtual.   You will need to provide the Communication Access team with a link in advance that will allow the CART provider to access the live audio (e.g. Zoom session info/link, web streaming link, etc.).  It’s best practice to admit the CART provider early so that they can set up and test before your event begins.

The McBurney Center will provide you with a Streamtext web link in advance that may be used to view the captions on individual devices or displayed on a monitor for the in-person audience. View Streamtext demo of live professional captions.

Let us know if you are using a platform that has a backstage (e.g. StreamYard) and/or involves a streaming delay (e.g. YouTube Live), so that we can work together to find the best setup.

How does professional captioning work with virtual breakout rooms?

Your staff will need to place the CART provider into a specific room when you are doing breakout sessions. Let your participants know ahead of time which room will have the professional captions.

If you will need professional captions in multiple break out rooms, there will need to be multiple CART providers hired and they will need to be assigned by the host to the rooms where they are requested. You will have to provide the participants with the link to the captions as the captions will not be able to appear in multiple breakout rooms simultaneously.

Where do the captions appear for a live, onsite event?

You have the option to display the captions for a live event either on individual device(s) (laptop, tablet, or mobile device) or projected/displayed onto a large screen or monitor for public viewing.

If you choose to display the captions on a screen or monitor for everyone to see, someone from your team or the venue’s tech support will need to:

  • provide the equipment (separate projector & screen or monitor for the captions, laptop, cables, and internet access)
  • set up and test the equipment
  • open the live captioning link
  • provide technical support

If you choose to have participants view the captions on their individual device, it is important that you share that information prior to the event so that the participant brings a device. You should also check with the participant to determine if they need access a power source.

How do I set up my Zoom settings to allow for live professional captioning (CART) within Zoom?

There are several steps you will need to take when setting up your Zoom session to make sure the CART provider can provide the captions in Zoom. See  Set Up for Professional Captioning in Zoom for more information.

Once the CART provider is hired for your request, the Communication Access Team will send you their name.   You will need to add the CART provider and the Tech Team from the McBurney Center to your Zoom session as Alternate Hosts (in Webinar mode) or Co-Host (in a standard Zoom meeting) to allow them to enter the session early.

How can I adjust the font size of the live captions?

The Communication Access Team will provide you with a link to the live captions prior to your event.   You will be able to adjust the size and color of the font within this display. You can then share this link with your audience, so they can also customize how the captions are displayed.

General information about Sign Language Interpreting

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I only have one deaf person attending. Why do I need two interpreters?

Sign language interpreting is mentally and physically demanding. Therefore, two interpreters may be needed, depending on the request. It is standard industry practice to provide two interpreters for any request over 75 minutes. If a request is particularly technical, two interpreters may be needed for a shorter request as well. McBurney Center staff will consult with you about your request to determine if two interpreters are needed.

I will be hosting an event and would like to have the interpreter in the Zoom session. What do I need to do prior to and during the event?

For a Zoom meeting, we would recommend adding the interpreter as an alternative host to the Zoom session prior to the event.   This will allow the interpreter to enter the Zoom session early and get set up. Once the interpreter is in the session, we also recommend giving the interpreters the ability to multi-pin.  See Allow Particpants to Multi-pin for information on how to give this access to interpreters.

For a Zoom webinar, if you would like the interpreter to be on the screen at all times, they should be invited to participate as a panelist.

I am using StreamYard for our event. Should the interpreter be “backstage” in StreamYard?

Contact the Communication Access team to discuss the specific request and to determine if the interpreter should be backstage or in a separate platform.

How do breakout sessions work with an interpreter?

Your staff will need to assign the interpreter to the specific room with the participant requesting the interpreter. If you do not have a specific request, then let your participants know ahead of time which room will have the interpreter.

If you will need interpreters in multiple break out rooms, there will need to be multiple interpreters hired and they will need to be assigned by the host to the rooms where they are requested. You will have to provide the participants with the link to the captions as the captions will not be able to appear in multiple breakout rooms simultaneously.

General Information About Post-Production Media Captioning for Pre-Recorded Media

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I am requesting interpreting and live professional captioning for an event and one of the speakers will be showing a media clip. Can the McBurney Center caption this?

Yes, if you are requesting sign language interpreting or live CART captioning for your event AND you will be showing media during the event, the McBurney Center can, with sufficient notice and early access, help produce the captioning for this media.

A student in class has asked me if they could have closed captioning on the media I show in class, can you provide this service?

If there is a student in your class that is approved for Media Captioning through the McBurney Center, someone from the Communication Access team will reach out to the instructor of record to discuss how to get your materials captioned.

If the student is not approved for services by the McBurney Center, you could create the post-production captioning within your department.

I do not have an accommodation request for our event, but I would like to have post-production captioning for the media that will be used. What are the options for creating closed captioning?

  1. Media captioning contract vendors – The contract vendors support a variety of video formats and caption file formats.
  2. Do-it-yourself using Kaltura machine captioning – Free, but requires editing and the addition of speaker info, sounds, and tone for compliant captions
    1. Ordering machine captions for media in Kaltura MediaSpace
    2. How to edit captions in Kaltura MediaSpace
    3. How to display captions for media in Kaltura MediaSpace

Please review the UW-Madison Guide – Create accessible video and audio content for additional information.

How much does it cost to send media to a campus contracted vendor for post-production captioning?

Some costs for media captioning will be covered centrally by campus.

  • Approved student classroom accommodation requests for media captioning
  • Media captioning requests that are associated with sign language interpreting or live professional captioning requests coordinated through the McBurney Center

Vendors charge different amounts depending on the lead time you provide to produce the captions for your media.  To learn more about campus contracted vendor prices and turnaround times, please visit: Captioning, transcription, and audio description vendor rate comparison.

Who pays for the post-production captioning if it is not associated with an interpreter or live professional captioning request?

Departments/schools/colleges are responsible for the cost of  media captioning.

See the Funding and Coordinating Accommodations for UW Students with Disabilities policy (updates in progress) and How to follow UW-Madison’s Digital Accessibility Policy for more information.

Sign Language Interpreting or Live Professional Captioning (CART) Coordinated through the McBurney Disability Resource Center

The McBurney Disability Resource Center coordinates sign language interpreting and live professional captioning (CART) services for UW-Madison.   Services can be provided for the following:

  • Onsite and Remote requests
  • For disability-related accommodation requests and for public access requests
  • Students, staff, faculty, visitors, and program participants at university events
  • University job applicants

Coordinating these services is a collaborative process involving the event host, the McBurney Center, and the participant or presenter requesting the accommodation.

Please provide information about your request as soon as you have a date and time, as requests and communication will take time.  All requests are subject to Interpreter and CART provider availability, particularly requests made with short notice.

UW-Madison Departments, Programs, Student Organization Hosts, Event Coordinators, and UW Employees

UW Disability-Related Accommodation Request


Sign language interpreting or live professional captioning (CART) is requested by an individual as a disability-related accommodation to attend or participate in the event.

Accommodation requests for sign language interpreting and live professional captioning (CART) are funded centrally by campus.

Use this form if you have a UW NetID and would like to make a request for a disability-related accommodation for sign language interpreting or live captioning for yourself or someone else.

UW Disability Accommodation Request

UW General Public Access


Department or host is providing sign language interpreting or live professional captioning (CART) service proactively for all attendees without a specific disability-related accommodation request from a participant.

Public Access requests are funded by the department sponsoring the event.

Use this form if you have a UW NetID and want to provide sign language interpreting or live captioning proactively, without a disability-related accommodation request.

UW Public Access Request

UW-Madison Visitor, Program Participant, or Job Applicant

UW-Madison Visitor, Program Participant, or Job Applicant


Use this form if you do not have a UW NetID and would like to make a sign language interpreter or professional live captioning (CART) disability-related accommodation request as a UW visitor, participant, or job applicant.

UW-Madison Visitor, Program Participant or Job Applicant Request (No UW NetID)

Parent, Guardian, and Support Team Information for First Year & Incoming Students

McBurney Center Director Welcome Video

(Note that the spoken English and American Sign Language versions cover the same content)

Spoken English with closed captions (CC)

American Sign Language (ASL) version, NO audio or captions

Supporting Your Student

As students head off to college, this is a time of great transition – both for them and for you. How can you best support your student, and their transition?

  • Form a partnership and keep open lines of communication with your student. Learn about the policies, procedures and options presented by the University and serve as an advisor and consultant to your student.
  • Check in with your student as they settle in to college life.
  • Ask your student guiding questions. If they are planning to use accommodations, ask if they have:
    • completed the student virtual MOST training through Canvas
    • generated their Student Accommodation Letters (SAL) through McBurney Connect,
    • met with their instructors to discuss implementation of those accommodations.
  • Note that students will request accommodations for each of their classes every semester.
  • Understand that McBurney Center staff, like others on campus, cannot discuss your student with you without a release of information. The Family Educational Rights & Privacy Act (FERPA) applies to UW-Madison and protects student privacy.
  • Reinforce the importance of timely communication – encourage your student to ask questions of McBurney Center staff, and of their instructors. Students are now holding the reins, which may be new for them. They need to form a schedule that works for them, establish healthy routines, request their accommodations, talk with their instructors – and ask for help when they need it.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

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Does my student need to re-apply for accommodations each year?

Once students complete our eligibility process, they typically remain eligible for those same accommodations throughout their academic career at UW. Your student’s Access Consultant may request updated documentation if your student starts to experience new barriers during their time on campus and subsequently request new accommodations. Feel free to get to know our McBurney Center Team.

Your student may find that the university setting is different enough from high school that they want to adjust the types of accommodations they have. Students can revisit accommodations at any time with their Access Consultant.

How does my student request accommodations in their courses? Is there anything else they need to do to make sure their professors accommodate them appropriately?

Once students are approved for accommodations, they gain access to our database called McBurney Connect. Each semester, your student will login to McBurney Connect to submit their accommodation requests. They will have full control over which classes they request accommodations in and which of their specifically approved accommodations they want to use in those classes. Once they make their requests, McBurney Connect will automatically generate emails that get sent to the instructors with a copy of their Student Accommodation Letter (accommodation plan). We generally recommend that students login to McBurney Connect to generate their Student Accommodation Letters prior to the start of the semester or within the first week of classes.

After students generate their Student Accommodation Letters, we expect them to setup face-to-face meetings with each of their instructors by the third week of class. During these meetings, they will discuss each of the accommodations they requested and how those will be implemented in this specific course.

Can I have free and open communication with my student’s Access Consultant?

No. Students who work with the McBurney Center are protected by the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). Students must voluntarily complete and sign a release of information form if they wish to allow their Access Consultant open communication with a parent or other member in their life.

Will campus contact me if my student is not doing well?

No. FERPA applies to all areas of campus life. It will be up to your student to alert you if they are not doing well personally or academically.

What other campus resources should I know about?

UW-Madison offers a wide breadth of important resources that your students may want to use during their time on campus. You can explore some of these below:

  • Academic Advising: All students at UW-Madison are assigned an academic advisor who can assist with scheduling classes, exploring interests, and finding ways to expand involvement on campus.
  • Career Exploration Center (CEC): The CEC is part of the Cross-College Advising Service (CCAS) and is designed to assist students in exploring their options for majors and careers.
  • Center for First Year Experience (CFYE): CFYE helps student adjust to life at UW-Madison. The provide a variety of opportunities through orientation and programming to ease the first-year transition.
  • Dean of Students Office: The Dean of Students Office provides assistance, intervention, prevention, and referral services to the university community.
  • Greater University Tutoring Service (GUTS): GUTS is a student organization dedicated to connecting UW students with volunteer tutors for assistance with academic courses, study skills, conversational English, and intercultural exchange.
  • Parent and Family Program: This program helps engage parents, stepparents, extended family members, foster parents, legal guardians, and other chosen family members in campus life to assist their student during their time on campus. The program includes an e-newsletter, campus events, web chats, and more.
  • Student Affairs: The McBurney Center falls under the branch of Student Affairs, which are dedicated to serving students and to helping them succeed in and out of the classroom in areas including health and well-being, identity and inclusion, leadership and engagement, and student advocacy.
  • University Health Services (UHS): UHS is the UW-Madison student health center, with a mission to enhance learning and student success by promoting, protecting, and restoring health and well-being.
  • UHS – Mental Health Services: MHS’ mental health providers understand the complexities of student life and offer an open, safe and confidential environment to help students through issues that may interfere with their development, well-being, and academic productivity.

Where should my student go for support if they are struggling academically, personally, or otherwise?

Students are always free to meet with their Access Consultant if they are struggling, and their Consultant can provide resources specific to their individualized needs. They can also turn to a variety of Academic Services, Mental Health Services, Health and Wellness, and Student Assistance through the Dean of Students Office.

Who will help my student create a class schedule each semester?

Each student on campus has an Academic Advisor who can assist them with class scheduling, major declaration, and other academic-related needs throughout their career at UW. Your student may also work with their Access Consultant if they wish to receive feedback on the balance of their class schedule.

Who should my student contact if they are struggling in one or more courses? What are their options if they are not on track to pass a course?

We recommend that students first contact their professors or TA’s if they are struggling in their classes. They can meet with them during office hours or schedule another time to check in to talk about their progress and receive tips for how to improve their grades. They may also want to check in with their Academic Advisor  and explore the academic supports that are available to students on campus.  Note that tutoring is available from a variety of sources and in a variety of formats and locations across campus.

It is important for students to remain cognizant of the semester dates and deadlines set forth by the Registrar’s Office. There are a variety of drop deadlines each semester. They can always work with their Academic Advisor or Access Consultant if they want to discuss dropping classes or withdrawing from UW.

Where can my student go to get involved around campus?

There are a variety of ways for students to get involved in and around campus. They can explore the Wisconsin Involvement Network to see all the student organizations available on campus. They may want to consider applying for a student job during their time here. Many students choose to study abroad while on campus, and it is important to note students may use their disability-related accommodations during their time abroad as well. The University consistently updates their calendar of campus events, which provides a vast number of opportunities going on each day.

Winter Weather Resources

  1. Campus snow removal requests and accessibility campus tractor clearing sidewalks on Bascom Hill
  2. The Campus Accessible Circulator Shuttle – The shuttle can pick students/staff/visitors up and drop them off at campus buildings
  3. Indoor routes on the campus (PDF) – There are two no-step interior routes that connect buildings 1) from University Ave to the top of Bascom Hill ( Bascom Hall, Social Sciences and Ingraham Hall) via Chamberlin Hall, Sterling Hall, and Van Vleck Hall and 2) from University Avenue to Linden Drive, via Medical Sciences Center, Social Work, and the Middleton Building.

 

Training for Campus

The McBurney Center provides a variety of training an consultation to campus, including in-person and online.

Asynchronous, Online Training Options

Virtual and In-Person Training Options

McBurney Center Training Requests

The McBurney Disability Resource Center provides training to campus departments, units, faculty, staff, and student organizations on topics exploring disability and accessibility. Training could include accommodations & adaptive technology; disability awareness; identity & culture; or inclusion & universal design. Customized requests are also possible.

  • Complete Campus Online Request for McBurney Center Training - Please complete this form at least three weeks prior to your requested training date and include as much information as possible.
  • For assistance completing this form, or if you have questions or need additional information, please email the McBurney Center Training Team.
  • You will receive a follow-up to discuss and confirm your request. Please note, completing this request does not guarantee availability for the requested date/time of the training.

Furniture Accommodation Request Form for Students

Adaptive Technology Scholarship Application

Specialist, Study & Learning Skills (SLSS)

Mental Health Resources

Persistent feelings of depression or anxiety can interfere with academic performance and a student’s overall sense of well-being. Likewise, alcohol overuse or illicit drug use can have a very damaging impact on short term and long term academic performance. If you are experiencing these challenges or they are becoming more pronounced in the college environment, counseling support through University Health Services (UHS) is an appropriate next step. UHS provides screening services and intervention for mental health or alcohol and other drug abuse (AODA) concerns.